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The C. pomonella spends the winter as a mature larva spun up in a cocoon that is located on protected areas on the tree (bark crevices or cracks), which is the preferred location, or at the base of the tree in ground litter. In modern high density apple orchards there are very few cocooning sites on trees because of the smooth bark. Pupae form in the cocoon spun by the mature larva.

The adult stage emerges from the pupal case and after a short period to harden the exoskeleton it flies into the tree. Most literature indicates that moth activity occurs in the upper third of the tree canopy. Adults are active at dusk for a couple hours with an average activity threshold of between 13°C to 15°C. Mating usually occurs on the host and egg laying occurs directly afterwards. It is possible on warm evenings for a female moth to emerge, mate, and lay eggs in a two-day period. A C. pomonella moth can live over a 20 day periode under ideal conditions, however in fields it is likely they survive a much shorter time, especially in the hot summer. Under laboratory conditions a female moth lays up to 100 eggs, but the actual fecundity in the field is likely less and most are laid in the first few days after emergence and mating.

Eggs are laid individually on the upper surface of the leaf, on twigs or on fruit. In the first generation eggs are laid only on leaves until about two weeks after fruit have set when the fuzziness of the fruit wares off. In the second generation about 65% of the eggs are laid on leaves but these are usually very close to a fruit. Eggs are creamy white when first laid, have a red-ring mid-way though development and when near hatch the black head capsule can be seen.


A newly hatched larva wander until they locate a fruit. It chews through the skin and feeds on the apple flesh beneath the skin for a few days. In the process of chewing through the skin and feeding beneath the larvae pushes frass out the entry area. There is often a red ring surrounding the entry, especially in young fruit. After the larva molts to the next stage it bores toward the core where it will feed on seeds until mature. When nearly mature the larva will make a tunnel from the core to the exterior of the apple and will plug the hole with frass (excrement) and silk. When ready to spin a cocoon the larva leaves the fruit, wondering across the tree or dropping to the ground on a silk thread, and finds a protected location.
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The C.pomonella spends the winter as a mature larva spun up in a cocoon that is located on protected areas on the tree (bark crevices or cracks), which is the preferred location, or at the base of the tree in ground litter. In modern high density apple orchards there are very few cocooning sites on trees because of the smooth bark. Pupae form in the cocoon spun by the mature larva.

The adult stage emerges from the pupal case and after a short period to harden the exoskeleton it flies into the tree. Most literature indicates that moth activity occurs in the upper third of the tree canopy. Adults are active at dusk for a couple hours with an average activity threshold of between 13°C to 15°C. Mating usually occurs on the host and egg laying occurs directly afterwards. It is possible on warm evenings for a female moth to emerge, mate, and lay eggs in a two-day period. A C. pomonella moth can live over a 20 day periode under ideal conditions, however in fields it is likely they survive a much shorter time, especially in the hot summer. Under laboratory conditions a female moth lays up to 100 eggs, but the actual fecundity in the field is likely less and most are laid in the first few days after emergence and mating.

Eggs are laid individually on the upper surface of the leaf, on twigs or on fruit. In the first generation eggs are laid only on leaves until about two weeks after fruit have set when the fuzziness of the fruit wares off. In the second generation about 65% of the eggs are laid on leaves but these are usually very close to a fruit. Eggs are creamy white when first laid, have a red-ring mid-way though development and when near hatch the black head capsule can be seen.
A newly hatched larva wander until they locate a fruit. It chews through the skin and feeds on the apple flesh beneath the skin for a few days. In the process of chewing through the skin and feeding beneath the larvae pushes frass out the entry area. There is often a red ring surrounding the entry, especially in young fruit. After the larva molts to the next stage it bores toward the core where it will feed on seeds until mature. When nearly mature the larva will make a tunnel from the core to the exterior of the apple and will plug the hole with frass (excrement) and silk. When ready to spin a cocoon the larva leaves the fruit, wondering across the tree or dropping to the ground on a silk thread, and finds a protected location.

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